Is it possible to communicate with the fetus in their world

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How many touching, emotional moments have you had when you speak to your fetus and believe they hear you, feel your touch, or even see you?

You’re exactly right; the fetus’ senses begin to develop in the beginning of pregnancy to the point at which, beginning in the fifth month, they can recognize the sound of their mother’s voice and interact with her caresses.

What is the nature of the relationship born between a mother and her fetus during her months of pregnancy? And how can you develop it?

 

  • Talk to your baby whenever you can because they can interact simply with your voice, which they’ve got used to hearing every day; this type of communication boosts the ties between you after you give birth.

 

  • It’s certain that the fetus listens to voices, despite the fact that their middle ear is not fully formed before the eighth month. It has been observed that the fetus responds to these voices with a flutter of their eyelids, a sudden hand movement, or by twitching—sometimes even with a change in the rhythm of their heartbeat.

 

  • Know that the fetus is more responsive to their mother’s voice than any other voice they hear every day. They are capable of picking it out from a group of female voices in the same room, since it is the voice they hear the most daily, and the closest to them “geographically.”

 

  • This mother-child discourse provides a first exercise in the role of mother in the stage after delivery, and it boosts the special relationship that links them instinctually for their entire lives.

 

  • A mother weaves another, touch-based relationship with her fetus when she gently caresses her belly at the site of the fetus in her womb and pats it tenderly, giving them a greater feeling of safety. The fetus’ sense of touch will crystallize beginning in the fourth month, at which point they will become able to respond to these caresses in their own way.

 

So talk to your fetus whenever you can, caress them, listen to children’s songs or some soft music, but don’t overdo it. In no case should they be exposed to noisy music, sensory stimuli, or loud noises.