At What Age Should Your Child Have Friends?

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Your child turned one a little while ago, and up until then, you were convinced that you were the undisputed “love of their life.”

Then you discover on their birthday that your child has friends; John, Sam, Nicky, Susan, and Sara are milling around them. Their chats are based on their few words and half sentences … along with laughter and fun.

Are you wondering at what age your child will make friends? Well, children take friends and companions for themselves at an early age, contrary to what many parents believe! When do they arrive at this point, and how?

At the beginning, all their fellow companions are their friends. They will try to play and tumble to the ground with them, and with them, they’ll exchange hand-held toys, sweets, and sandwiches. You must encourage this stage as much as possible, as it helps them begin to communicate with others and prepares them for the stage at which they’ll enter day care.

However, as soon as your baby starts walking, the picture changes. They will go towards their own discoveries most of the time and will become more possessive of their toys and more demanding of others’ toys!

Therefore, it’s very important to boost their sense of friendship and partnership from the earliest age; achieving this will help them adjust to the school framework and in a community of relatives and neighbors in the first stage before reaching their school community.

  • Because companionship is constructive and essential for them since childhood, always work to surround them with children their age or slightly older at least once a week.
  • Make sure that there are some celebrations and events in your home so that they feel “at home” and demonstrate more confidence towards others.
  • Don’t “instigate” friendship with anyone and let them choose their friends in a way that’s comfortable to them. The important thing is that they not grow up alone.
  • Remember that socializing with children their age or slightly older boosts their development. They will learn a lot by imitating others.

Never minimize the importance of their little friendships; if their heroes are happy children, this will encourage them more to strike out into the big world with confidence and joy.