Clever Tricks for a Good Night’s Sleep?

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You tried rocking them with no result. You tried a bath before bedtime, and it wasn’t effective. You tried an evening walk in their little stroller but to no avail. You tried absolute quiet and then a little pleasant noise on its own. You tried children’s songs and then an “appropriate” classical piece… and finally you threw up your hands.

Your child doesn’t sleep … and neither do you!

Day after day, you wonder: How do I make my child sleep?

Is silence better than quiet sounds? Is a mother’s voice always better suited for the task than music? Which rhythm or tune do children fall asleep to?

Here are some clever tricks for a good night’s sleep and practical answers for solving the sleeping problem:

Music

It’s a sleep aid for some children, but it can’t be generalized. It has drawbacks, like the fact that it stimulates children’s brains and prevents them from relaxing fully to enjoy healthy sleep. Add to that that if the sound of certain music is what puts your child to sleep, it will be difficult for them to fall asleep without it.

Conclusion: Children’s music is recommended for the getting-ready-for-bed stage, no more.

White Noise

It is the expression of the tones that often help with relaxation, like the sounds of the sea, rain, or birdsong. A recording is placed in the child’s room, or you take the child on a picnic near water or in nature. It’s an idea that’s worth trying with your child, but only to stimulate sleep rather than letting it play all night.

Total Silence

It is usually not recommended to leave a child alone in a room without any sound around them to prepare them for sleep. You should remember that you will sometimes be forced to sleep with your child away from home, at their grandparents’ house or in a plane, bus, or car.

It’s also useful as, with time, the child begins to distinguish between the clamor of the day and the relative calm of night because this will help them to eventually differentiate between night and day.

What’s the Best for the Child?

Have faith that routine and consistency in habits are key in preparing your child for sleep. This routine is born once you understand your child’s character and rhythm; each child has their own rhythm that may not resemble other children’s.

Remember that when they were a fetus, they were surrounded by a broad swathe of sounds and noise, so don’t transform their room or house into a place of reclusion. As much as possible, keep your household activities, but protect them from loud sounds and noise that hurt their hearing and can expose them to stress.